Regional Agricultural Biotechnology Network
Near East and North Africa
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FAO Agricultural Biotechnologies
FAO Information Sources on Biotechnology
  • FAO Biotechnology website, which was launched in Arabic, Chinese, English, French and Spanish in 2001 and expanded to include Russian in 2007. It provides information on FAO's work and international developments regarding biotechnology techniques and products, as well as on related policy and regulatory issues surrounding research and deployment of agricultural biotechnology.
  • FAO Statement on Biotechnology, produced by the FAO Interdepartmental Working Group on Biotechnology in response to the many requests to know "where FAO stands on the biotechnology issue".
  • FAO Documents, currently providing over 210 web links to a wide range of articles, books, meeting reports, proceedings and studies published by FAO, or prepared in collaboration with FAO, over the last 13 years concerning agricultural biotechnologies.
  • FAO-Biotech News, The News items relate to applications of biotechnologies in food and agriculture in developing countries and their major focus is on the activities of FAO, other UN agencies/bodies and the 15 CGIAR research centres. The News items cover all food and agricultural sectors (crops, forestry, fisheries/aquaculture, livestock, agro-industry) and a wide range of biotechnologies (e.g. use of molecular markers, artificial insemination, triploidisation, biofertilisers, micropropagation, genomics, genetic modification etc.).
  • FAO-Biotech Events, The items focus on conferences, workshops, training courses and other events organised by FAO, other UN agencies/bodies and the 15 CGIAR research centres. The events cover all food and agricultural sectors (crops, forestry, fisheries/aquaculture, livestock, agro-industry) and a wide range of biotechnologies (e.g. use of molecular markers, artificial insemination, triploidisation, biofertilisers, micropropagation, genomics, genetic modification etc.).
  • FAO Biotechnology Forum, making a neutral platform available for people to exchange views and experiences on biotechnology in developing countries. The Forum has nearly 4,000 members worldwide and has hosted 16 moderated e-mail conferences since the year 2000, with about 50% of all messages posted coming from participants living in developing and developed countries respectively. Each conference takes one particular area of debate and the chosen themes have covered the appropriateness of biotechnology in the crop, forestry, livestock and fishery sectors, its implications for hunger and food security, the impact of intellectual property rights, gene flow from GM populations and its role in the agricultural research agenda. The two conferences held in 2003 dealt with the themes of regulation of GMOs and, secondly, the use of molecular markers for genetic improvement in developing countries. The last 6 conferences have dealt with food processing; publication participation in decision-making about GMOs; biotechnology and genetic resources for food and agriculture; biotechnology in drought-stressed areas; bioenergy; and 'learning from the past'.
  • FAO Glossary of Biotechnology, (published originally in English and later translated to Arabic, French, Russian, Serbian, Spanish and Vietnamese), that is also available as a multilingual searchable database.